What happens when CO levels are not monitored?

The dangers of working with carbon monoxide (CO) have been discussed in
detail; however, people continue to be negligent about exposure to this
dangerous gas and ignore all warnings, resulting in injury, illness or even death.
Being aware of these consequences should be more than sufficient for people
unsure of the rules and regulations surrounding CO to consider taking a
refresher course or retrain completely.

Safety should always be the highest priority for people working
with carbon monoxide gas.

What happens when safety
standards slip?

A case that went before the courts in the UK in 2012 presented the absolute
worst case scenario where an incorrect boiler installation in December 2010 led
to a CO leak at a residence, resulting in a 24-year-old woman succumbing
to the colourless, odourless gas in her bathroom. The incident occurred only
two weeks after a local tradesman had made repairs to the boiler in her
home.

According to the courts, the gasfitter was deemed responsible as the
leak was caused by a faulty boiler flue that was fitted during the job. The man
was found guilty of manslaughter by gross negligence, resulting in a criminal
conviction and a three-year prison sentence.

Though the judge acknowledged that there was no malice in the incident,
the prosecution believed the gasfitter had to pay the price for the offence.

Operating safely

The best way for companies to maintain safety standards is to use
dependable instruments that provide accurate measurements, eliminating any
guesswork in carbon monoxide monitoring and detection. Carbon monoxide is too
dangerous to manage by gut instinct alone and requires advanced devices to test
its presence.

The testo 310-1 basic flue gas analyser is an entry level
instrument for first-time buyers or for those who’re upgrading from an analogue
equivalent. testo flue gas analysers are digital instruments that provide precise,
easy-to-read, and accurate measurements.

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